Amazon to ship electronics in Brazil from third-party sellers

SAO PAULO (Reuters) – Amazon.com Inc began offering electronics from third-party sellers to Brazilian shoppers on Wednesday, expanding beyond books in the fiercely competitive e-commerce market in Latin America’s largest economy.

The long-awaited move will offer televisions, cell phones and laptops from hundreds of independent sellers on Amazon’s website in Brazil without involving the company in the tricky logistics that have hurt many online retailers in the country.

Alex Szapiro, Amazon’s country manager in Brazil, declined to say if there were plans for the company to stock its own electronics inventory or open a fulfillment center to ship third-party goods more efficiently, as it did simultaneously with the launch of independent sellers in Mexico two years ago.

“Each country has a different playbook,” said Szapiro in an interview with Reuters at Amazon headquarters in Sao Paulo. He helped launch the company’s Brazil business with e-books in 2012 after running operations for Apple Inc in the country for five years.

Shares of local e-commerce rivals MercadoLibre Inc, Magazine Luiza SA and B2W Cia Digital have fallen 14 percent, 17 percent and 20 percent, respectively, in the past week on concerns of heightened competition from Amazon.

Keeping pace with the local e-commerce market, Amazon will parcel purchases into as many as 10 monthly installments without interest, a practice the company started in Brazil for Kindle e-reader sales in 2014, then extended to Mexico and other markets.

Sellers will be paid up-front, minus a 10 percent commission to Amazon and fees of 19 reais ($ 6) per month or 2 reais per item. Szapiro called the 10 percent commission a “promotional” rate without saying when or how much it would eventually rise.

($ 1 = 3.16 reais)

Reporting by Brad Haynes; Editing by Lisa Shumaker

Tech

Related Posts:

7 Things You Should Know Before Making a Major Career Decision

A friend of mine recently announced that his employer was closing the facility where he currently worked and moving its function to a larger facility about 600 miles away.

They gave him a choice: 1) relocate or 2) work remotely from home without relocating. Last I heard, he’d decided to relocate. His logic was as follows:

  1. As is typical in this sort of announcement, some of the coworkers at his facility were laid of rather than given a choice.
  2. The stated reason behind the relocation was to increase the amount of contact between employees in hopes of creating a more collaborative culture.
  3. Working from home would place him out of the collaborative loop and thus make him more likely to be laid off in the future.

While I understand his logic, I’m not sure he’s made the right decision.

Based upon what I’ve seen and experienced in the corporate world, there are seven essential truths to consider before making any major career decision.

1. There is no such thing as job security.

Millions of people have pursued their careers under the assumption that if they do the job required of them–and do it well–t they’ll remained employed and even get regular, reasonably-sized raises. And millions of people, having made huge sacrifices for their employers, have gotten fired anyway.

2. Always have options in your back pocket.

In my most recent book, Business Without the Bullsh*t, I recommend always having at least three different job opportunities under development, as well as a written plan for what you’d do, and who you’ll call, should you lose your job or decide to leave. If you’ve got options, your employer can’t bully. You make decisions based on opportunity not fear.

3. Know your true value to your company.

All companies, large or small, want to compensate you as little as possible while getting you to create (for them) as much value as possible. By contrast, it’s in your interest to get your compensation as close as possible to the value you’re creating, allowing for a fair profit to your employer. Essential question: how much would it cost to replace you?

4. Bad managers love management fads.

Thirty years ago, it was Total Quality Management; twenty years ago, it was Reengineering; ten years ago, it was Disruptive Innovation; today it’s the Collaborative Office. Popular management panaceas, at best, serve as corporate productivity taxes.  Worst case, they actively drive companies out of business. Be forewarned.

5. Do the numbers before you decide.

Consider the hidden costs before making any career decision. In my friend’s case, working from home eliminates commute time. Adding, say, an hour commute (both ways) to a 50-hour work week is the equivalent to a 20 percent pay cut! Similarly, relocating away from extended family could mean increased child-care costs. Always do the math!

6. Never make a career decision out of fear.

Fear is a useful emotion for making short-term decisions like “Should I try to pet that strange dog?” Fear is worse than useless, how, when making long-term decisions like “Where should I work?” or “What should I do for a living?” Making career decisions out of fear tends to land people in jobs that they hate and miss opportunities for jobs they’d truly enjoy.

7. The true measure of success is happiness.

As I’ve pointed out previously, it’s better to be happy and poor than miserable and rich. Of course, it’s easier to be happy when you don’t need to worry about money but past a certain point, it’s harder to achieve more happiness than more money. With this in mind, most people are happier when they work for home

Tech

Related Posts: